Category Archives: Anya’s Garden Perfumes

Making Perfume – Working with Thick Aromatics

Monday - 30 September 2019

Making Perfume: Working with Thick and Pasty Aromatics

I have been working with perfumery aromatics since 1976. That’s the year I began to seriously study perfumery with the aid of a few rare books and the assistance of two retired perfume industry sales representatives. I had already been collecting essential oils and absolutes for hippie fun, but that year I got serious about making perfume.

At that time, I hadn’t come across labdanum, tonka bean absolute, myrrh, and some of the other thick and pasty aromatics. The thick ones, as I’ll call them from here out, are impossible to pour, or use with a dropper. When I did come across them, the perfume reps taught me about diluting* aromatics to work with them, both the thin, pourable stuff and especially the thick, difficult-to-work-with ones. *Dilution is the subject of another blog and is taught in Module one of my course.

I remember my jaw dropping when I read a perfumer recommend something like “50 drops” or labdanum in a “recipe”. Impossible! (and amateurish, too). This was about 15 years ago, and I was already using diluted aromatics to make my mods (modifications are the name given the experimentation with aromatics when composing perfume alternatives).

The typical way to make the thick oils more fluid was to heat the bottle they were in a bain-marie aka a water bath. What is a bain-marie? An invention by Maria the Jewess in ancient Egypt adapted for modern culinary and in our case, perfumery work. In the culinary world, custards, cheesecakes, and other foods are either cooked in or kept warm in, a pot containing water.

I typically used a “coffee cup” warmer with a borosilicate beaker on it that contained water up to about the halfway mark on the aromatics bottle. Messy and dangerous.

A Wonderful Revelation in Working with Thick Aromatics

So, for years, artisan perfumers were placing the bottles of myrrh, fir balsam absolute, oakmoss absolute, etc, into a pot of hot water. You had to pay careful attention that the water didn’t get too hot, and VERY careful when you removed the bottle from the water to pour the aromatic. Use a potholder, and make sure not one drop of water got into the receiver bottle, or the aromatic would be contaminated. A lot of scary, potentially dangerous work.

I have been teaching distance-learning perfumery online courses since 2007, pioneering both the concept of learning natural perfumery outside of the classroom, but more importantly to me, sharing decades of workarounds and introducing modern techniques to aspiring perfumers.

Bottle of aromatic in hot rice to liquify so it is pourable.

Four ounce bottle of thick labdanum absolute nestled in hot rice

A few years into the course, in the student forum where we all chat, a student shared a brilliant idea about an alternative to using a bain-marie. Michael Singles suggested that fill a bowl or beaker with rice, heat the rice (two minutes seems to be a good time) in a microwave and then insert the bottle into the rice for a few minutes, and the thick oil will liquify. It works beautifully!¬† I have been on perfume and aromatherapy forums for decades, and had never seen this tip, it was a revelation! BTW, at the time, I didn’t have a microwave, and I heated the rice in a small saucepan on the stove, which also works beautifully.

Snuggling a bottle down into the hot rice

You’ll still need a potholder to handle the hot bottle, but no water is involved, no mess, no fuss! You have to reinsert the bottle into the bowl or beaker occasionally, as it does start to solidify after a few minutes, but what a great relief to have such an easy way to warm oils to make them pourable!

If the receiver bottle or jar has a wide enough opening, you can just pour the aromatic, but you’ll probably find you need a pipette to transfer the oil or absolute.

The rice is reusable, so after you’re done, allow it to cool, and place it in an airtight container and keep it for the next session.

Using a beaker with the hot rice

Using a beaker with the hot rice. Of course, this can be scaled up for a large bottle.

Hot Rice and Stuck Caps

I told a friend I was working on this subject for my blog, and she said she had purchased several bottles of myrrh and couldn’t open them. Myrrh is notoriously thick and sticky, and I guess the cap is fused to the neck of the bottle. In this case, I would recommend burying the bottle in the hot rice and then attempting to open it. If successful, I would recommend pouring the now-liquified myrrh into a *jar*. Suppliers should pack thick aromatics in jars, not narrow-necked bottles, in my opinion. Once in the jar, you should apply a thin layer of coconut oil to the inside of the cap threads, and to the jar threads, as this might help avoid the stuck cap problem in the future.

I hope I have helped readers with this *sticky* problem and saved them having to deal with boiling water and all the subsequent problems that may entail. Let me know if this post has helped you, I know I depend on this method every time I work with thick, unpourable aromatics. This tip has been in the textbook for my Basic Course in natural perfumery since 2010, so there are many using this method. I gladly pass it on to the rest of the artisan community to help y’all out. I’ve shared it in various posts over the years, but recently realized I hadn’t blogged about it. Start heating that rice!

 

 

Helpful tools for perfumemaking

Monday - 29 July 2019

Essentials pictured above very useful, but not an exhaustive list represented here in this photo. More perfumemaking tools are shown below in this post.

PHOTO: stainless steel tray for surface protection when pouring, filling bottles, etc. Stainless steel measuring cups and spoons. Borosilicate beakers, stainless steel funnels, stainless potato ricer for straining botanicals from alcohol tincture. Stainless steel strainers when filtering tinctures. Thermometers for heating materials. Graduated cylinders, droppers, and offset spatula for enfleurage lids. Not pictured: stainless steel bowls, filter papers.

It’s not just beakers, and pipettes and scales, there are many interesting and inexpensive tools for perfume making that I have found indispensable. Here are some of the tools and gadgets I’ve found helpful in the perfumemaking process. Please google or do further research into any process you’re interested in, as I won’t be answering individual questions about them on the blog. My students learn about these at different stages of their studies and receive in-depth training and have questions answered in their forums. When my new teaching site launches, there will be over 100 pages of supplemental materials for their enjoyment/learning at http://PerfumeClasses.com

Monprene dropper

For years, I used rubber dropper tops, and finally gave up, due to evaporation of the alcohol and essential oil dilutions, rendering my carefully-weighed dilutions useless. Then I found out about laboratory-grade monprene bulbs. They’re made to resist any solvents, and my perfume organ is now evaporation-proof! I think the smallest size the monprene droppers come in is for 15ml/half-ounce bottles, which you see in the picture. Available in black or white.

Ah, visual serenity, aesthetic beauty, and so much more refined! This perfume organ should be the desired type for artisan perfumers. Modern, cost-effective, and so easy to use!

Ah, visual serenity, aesthetic beauty, and so much more refined! This perfume organ should be the desired type for artisan perfumers. Modern, cost-effective, and so easy to use!

Scale

I make my perfumes by diluted aromatics/dropper method, and then, using specific gravity calculations, measure the undiluted aromatics I need to make the perfume. A scale helps in both processes. First, I dilute using the aromatic and alcohol weights to the desired concentration, and then I later measure the aromatic for the finished perfume. A good, inexpensive scale can work for this, especially in the dilution phase. Find a scale that measures down to the hundredths (0.00) and up to 200 grams, even 100 grams will do. Use borosilicate (lightweight) 50 ml beakers for the dilution measurements. Upgrade to a 0.00 to 500-gram scale as your business grows ūüėČ

 

Wax-Carving Tools

When working with thick aromatics like labdanum, tonka bean absolute and such, nothing makes it easier to remove from the bottle for dilution or weighing than wax carving tools. They’re stainless steel so they’re non-reactive and very sturdy, they won’t bend or break off in the bottle.

Separatory Funnel

This is handy for both perfumes and distillation, i.e., separating essential oil from the hydrosol. I’m using this illustration because it’s labeled, but separatory funnels are glass and require a metal stand to hold them upright.

Conductivity meter aka Total Dissolved Solids meter

I make a lot of tinctures from flowers, leaves, roots, etc., in alcohol. The essential oils in the botanicals dissolve in the alcohol and you can measure the amount with these inexpensive meters. Alcohol equals 0 on the meter, and each time you recharge the alcohol by straining out the spent botanical and adding fresh botanical to the alcohol, you can check the TDS number. At a certain point, you will see the number stops rising, and that means the alcohol is saturated with the essential oil, and you can cease recharging. Very handy device.

 

Mixer with Teflon bars

Mixers work to blend perfumes before bottling. They’re not always necessary, but are helpful when there are 1) oils that are very different in consistency, or 2) you want to help the “aging” or “maturation” process of your perfume.¬† See the vortex in the beaker? The Teflon bar is on the bottom, and a force in the mixer causes it to churn. Keep your perfume covered with a plate, and run the mixer in short bursts, stopping every 12 hours or so to evaluate the change in the perfume.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sterilize Equipment with UV light

After washing your bottles, caps, and equipment, it’s a good idea to sterilize them, especially true if you’re making hydrosols. These UV units are sold to the tattoo and nail arts businesses but are suitable for small scale sterilization for our purposes. Get one with a top rack, as shown. I put clean bottles on the top rack, and it’ll fit two one-quart jars or many smaller bottles. I put the caps facing upwards on the bottom, as the light will pass through the glass and sterilize the caps. Some hydrosol equipment is shown in the photo below.


 

Vacuum pump for filtration

 

These are primarily used drain brake fluid from cars but have been adapted to aid in the filtration of perfumes with a Buchner filter and Erlenmeyer flask. Make sure to wear eye protection when using this, the spring inside may fly out. Inexpensive but a bit tricky. There are more expensive, different filtering devices on the market.

Potato Ricer to Strain Tincture material

I use a stainless steel food press as an herbal press for small amounts. I was able to fit about half the spent flowers into the first pressing.

I use a stainless steel food press as an herbal press for small amounts. I was able to fit about half the spent flowers into the first pressing.

Microplane grater

I’ve seen people grinding precious ambergris in a mortar and pestle, and I’d never do that! Too much waste of the gris, and who needs a scented mortar? I use these instead, and they’re fast and non-reactive.

Microplane grater suitable for making ambergris tincture

Microplane grater suitable for making ambergris tincture

That’s all for now, I’ll follow up with more tools and techniques I’ve found useful in perfumemaking in my decades of experimenting and refining the process. In the meantime, subscribe to my blog to see the latest in modern techniques for natural perfumery, and any aromatic observations I make.

My professional perfumery course comes with a textbook, unique forms, charts, and more. It’s a worldwide distance-learning course, established in 2007.

I started a group on Facebook that is focused on Modern Perfumery Techniques. Join us.

Homemade Perfume reviews, giveaway in newsletter

Sunday - 26 August 2018

My latest newsletter contains reviews of my new book Homemade Perfume, a book giveaway on a blog, and info on my professional perfumery course.

You can purchase Homemade Perfume  here, either a Kindle version or paperback.
In Homemade Perfume, I instruct you on how to select oils, or extracts you have made from your garden, how to blend them, and how to make lovely fragrant products like liquid or solid perfumes, body powder, room and linen sprays, and much more. Included is a carefully curated list of suppliers for everything from bottles to alcohol, tools, essential oils and miscellaneous supplies.
Reviews
“In¬†Homemade Perfume, [Anya McCoy] gives you step by step instructions that are very clear, and with their help, you can make your own essential oils, tinctures, even hydrosols! … The book is really nicely produced, clear, with a large number of photographs so you not only have instructions, but also have visual references to help you to understand exactly what to do, and how to do it in sequence. … You really do get comprehensive advice here, and it is by far the best book I have seen on this subject.”
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† –Blacknall Allen’s A Perfume Blog
For Kindle readers:
“I’m impressed. This author knows how to teach and write instructions, and is extremely knowledgeable about the topic. I’ve read a lot of instructional books (I have a strange passion for how-to books, and I have a lot of hobbies so I tend to actually use the information). This book is well-written and well-designed. It seems care was taken to make the Kindle version actually usable which is, sadly, often not the case. I was able to read and use this book on my phone – very handy for a reference book.”
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† — Carol C.
“Love my book!”
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†— Bernadette H.

On the Fragrantica blog:

All in all, Homemade Perfume by Anya McCoy is a book that I feel should not only serve as a delicious conversation piece on my coffee table, for anyone visiting my place, but also as a personal reference for when the mood strikes to get down the shelf and try composing a Sensual Tincture Room and Linen Spray (recipe on page 121) or an Easy Pomade Semi-Solid Perfume (recipe on page 116).
 Anya has already conducted that crucial subject of such an opus as harvesting your own materials and making your own scents; safety precautions. Not only are her plant suggestions thoroughly researched (she clearly mentions that should you venture outside her propositions, you need to do your own research just to be sure), but her quantitative suggestions are carefully dosed to comply with FDA guidelines for skin use and for allergy precautions.
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† — Elena Vosnaki

“I received my copy and it’s WONDERFUL. Thank you so much. <3”

¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†–Laura E.K.
“Yay! Got mine today…it is beautiful and I was so excited as I skimmed…I have a beautiful stand of yesterday, today and tomorrow bushes that are prolific bloomers! and I never thought about tincturing or distilling them! Can’t wait!”
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† –Judy K.
“I received my book on the 31st. Beautifully done. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us!”
¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†–Cynthia H.
You can purchase Homemade Perfume here, either a Kindle version or paperback.
Random Selection Giveaway for readers who leave a comment
Isabelle Gellé is a noted natural perfumer, and I was honored that she reviewed Homemade Perfume for the Cafleurebon blog. If you comment on the review, you will be entered in a worldwide drawing to win a signed copy of my book. Read the review here and comment, and good luck!
Homemade Perfume is an entry book for those who want to learn about perfumery, or a perfumer/homesteader/gardener who has fragrant plants growing and wants to learn how to extract their scent.

However – Do you want to be a professional perfumer?

 Homemade Perfume, my new book, contains a lot of information but is for the hobbyist. For anyone who wants to have a career in perfumery, my online distance-learning course is comprehensive and will give you all the information you need to establish a business. The Basic Course comes with a 350-page textbook, the first ever written in the United States. I am a former adjunct professor in a graduate course at Florida Atlantic University, so I bring my decades of experience to this textbook.
Something you can’t get anywhere else – Supplemental materials that include both Word.doc and Excel.xls forms to allow you to update your perfume-making notes so that they’re easily searchable, charts, and other helpful products.¬†Visit the old site¬†and get 10% off tuition on both the Individual Study and the Private Tutorial Basic Courses. 10% will be refunded after paid enrollment. Also, check if the PayPal credit option appeals to you if you’re a USA resident.
Here’s a sample of the Table of Contents
Enroll now, and begin your next stage in life – as a perfumer!
The Natural Perfumery Institute – established 2007
The Natural Perfumers Guild is always working to protect the rights of natural fragrance businesses!
For over 10 years, the Natural Perfumers Guild has been a guiding force and self-regulated association dedicated to the use of natural aromatics. If you have a natural fragrance business, please join us as we continue to build our natural perfume community, define and defend the use of 100% natural aromatics, and educate the public on the beauty of them. Click here to read more, and purchase products from our members with the confidence of the naturalness of the ingredients.
From Miami, our best wishes
Anya, Brian, Gracie, Andrea, and Danny

Homemade Perfume book #1 best seller on Amazon

Monday - 30 July 2018

This has happened several times during the pre-sales time frame on Amazon – Homemade Perfume made it to #1 in Aromatherapy (and a few times in Nature Crafts, too)! Thank you for your support in pre-ordering my book, and I got word today that even though the release date isn’t until tomorrow, several buyers got emails from Amazon today that it’s shipped, and they’ll receive it tomorrow – how wonderful!

Homemade Perfume book number one aromatherapy july

Here’s some information about the book, but I invite you to go to Amazon and “look inside” for much more detail on what information and educational offerings are in Homemade Perfume!

“This unprecedented, comprehensive guide from renowned perfumer Anya McCoy is an inspiring resource for anyone interested in creating artisanal perfume at home. Discover simple step-by-step methods for making perfume without harsh chemicals. Jump right in, using local plants and common household ingredients. Soon you‚Äôll be building your own scent collection and¬†creating unforgettable gifts for friends and family.

This book covers a variety of techniques for capturing fragrances from natural materials, making it easy to choose the project that works for your schedule and experience level. Source your own organically grown botanicals, and enjoy the earth-friendly benefits of creating your own essential oils and extractions sustainably.

Make your own all-natural perfumes, room and linen sprays, body butters, massage oils, and more. Explore the nuances of scent blending to create delightful fragrances that are unique to you. Packed with easy methods and expert guidance, this book will become an indispensable reference as you grow into a confident scent designer.”

Buy your copy now and enjoy the fun projects that will help you make fragrant, natural gifts and products!

Homemade Perfume book by Anya McCoy July 31, 2018

Sunday - 1 July 2018

Homemade Perfume Book by Anya McCoy cover

Homemade Perfume Book by Anya McCoy cover

 

Homemade Perfume will be published July 31, 2018! You can preorder now and lock in the price. http://amzn.to/2HG7Bhs

 

This unprecedented, comprehensive guide from renowned perfumer Anya McCoy is an inspiring resource for anyone interested in creating artisanal perfume at home. Discover simple step-by-step methods for making perfume without harsh chemicals. Jump right in, using local plants and common household ingredients. Soon you’ll be building your own scent collection and creating unforgettable gifts for friends and family.

This book covers a variety of techniques for capturing fragrances from natural materials, making it easy to choose the project that works for your schedule and experience level. Source your own organically grown botanicals, and enjoy the earth-friendly benefits of creating your own essential oils and extractions sustainably.

Make your own all-natural perfumes, room and linen sprays, body butters, massage oils, and more. Explore the nuances of scent blending to create delightful fragrances that are unique to you. Packed with easy methods and expert guidance, this book will become an indispensable reference as you grow into a confident scent designer.

Jasmine Syrup Perfume for your mouth!

Thursday - 28 June 2018

So many jasmines, so much fun! You can do this with any non-toxic, organic fragrant flower you have in your garden, and the tasty syrup is fabulous in cocktails, drizzeled over ice cream or cake, or anything you can think of!

jasmine grand duke of tuscany

Big, sweet, fruity jasmine sambac ‘grand duke of tuscany’ flowers

Pick the flowers when they’re at the height of fragrance, and quickly process them. Pick over any wilted flowers, or any stems. Here’s the quick and easy recipe:

Flower Simple Syrup

2 cups of sugar

2 cups of water

2 cups of flowers

Place the sugar and water in a saucepan, and stir constantly while bringing to a boil. Once it’s boiled, remove from the heat, and add the flowers, gently stirring them into the syrup. Cover and allow to cool or up to three hours. Strain the flowers out, using a stainless steel strainer, into a sterile jar, cover, and refrigerate.

jasmine maid of orleans

jasmine maid of orleans

The ecological wonder of The Great Green Wall

Wednesday - 10 January 2018

Forty years ago, my husband got funding for his PhD under the USA Department of AID. In return, we were going to move to Dakar, Senegal for a few years to pay back the money for the education. I was studying plant science, ethnobotany, and anthropology at the time, and did a lot of research to prepare for the move. As an avid supporter of the Appropriate Technology movement, and an agriculturist with a keen interest in arid and semi-arid tropical plants, I was ready to work at some form of halting the southward spread of the Sahara Desert into Sub-Sahelian Africa. The US AID did not require us to go to Senegal for some reason, but my love of the region that developed due to all my research never stopped.

great green wall illustration

Some time ago I discovered the incredible project known as The Great Green Wall. Stretching from Senegal on the west coast, the effort was focused on planting a 10-mile wide band of drought-resistant trees to the east coast, ending in Somalia. I believe the primary plants are acacia trees and vegetables. Once the trees become established, their roots can pull up water from the low water table, making it more available for crops, and this is badly needed in this region. The trees will also help cool the air temperatures slightly, a bonus.

great green wall

The acacia being planted is Acacia senegalia senegal, a source of gum arabic, which has many uses in the food industry and other endeavors. As a perfumer, I’m wondering if the flowers have a lovely scent like Acacia farnesiana (cassie) or Acacia dealabata (mimosa). If so, the flowers could be harvested for extraction of the scent, adding another economic bonus.

green wall women farmers

green wall women farmers

As climate change is engulfing the world, and raising fears of loss of arable farmland, floods, hurricanes, and more damage, it is heartwarming to see that an initiative started 14 years ago is providing wonderful results. I may never get to visit Senegal or the Sahelian region, but my heart has long been there, loving the culture, and the hardworking, tenacious people. Bravo to Senegal for investing so much in the project, and building the greatest horticultural feature on earth, in cooperation with the other nations.

Modern techniques for making perfume

Sunday - 7 January 2018

Perfumers need to be savvy about how to provide a safe product to their customers. Perfume bottles and lab equipment can arrive from the factory with contaminants such as dust, bits of odds and ends (like paper), pesticides (from warehouse spraying) and other assorted things that need to be removed before filling or shipping. If you’re into making perfume or perfume products, you should read this.

Isn’t the New Year all about making good choices, and upping your game? Making sure you offer a sanitized (or more) product should be a goal for every perfumer.

Trio of Anya's Garden Perfumes

Trio of Anya’s Garden Perfumes – bottles and caps washed before filling to meet sanitary standards

I’m a bit of an OCD germaphobe to begin with, so making my product containers either sanitary, disinfected, or sterile (depending upon the end use) is very important. I explain in detail how to achieve these three goals in my upcoming book Homemade Perfume due out in August 2018 from Page Street Publishing.

Sanitary is a given, and easy: wash your equipment with hot soapy water, and air dry. That is necessary for everything. Disinfection can be achieved in a heat cycle in a dishwasher, or by using a bleach or alcohol rinse. Sterilization is most important for any container that will hold a product that contains water, like a lotion or hydrosol. For this purpose I prefer a UV light unit. I rarely have a container so big I need to bleach solution. Pictured you’ll find my unit, loaded with bottles on the top, and accessory tools on the bottom. I recommend buying a unit for cosmetology or tattooing purposes, they’re inexpensive and easily portable around your studio – plus, no bleach smell!

Caution: see the blue light? It can damage your eyes, so when the unit is on, I usually drape a cloth over it. This photo took about 3 seconds, and that’s all the exposure I allowed myself.

UV sterilization unit for making perfume products safe.

UV sterilization unit for making perfume products safe.

Homemade Perfume will be a gateway book for those who wish to learn basic techniques for making perfume. It is especially written for those who grow a number of fragrant plants, or who have access to them, so they can be perfume gardeners. The basics of tincturing and infusing for perfume, enfleurage, and distillation.

You will learn how to make body-, room-, and linen sprays; face-, body-, and hair vinegars; body butters; solid perfumes; alcohol- and oil-based perfumes; and more with your fragrant extractions.

If you wish to study how to make perfume professionally, consider taking my course through the Natural Perfumery Institute. The textbook is a compilation of four decades of perfume research, experimentation, and production. This is a distance learning course, and can be successfully completed from any place in the world. Click here to learn more.

Cyber Sale on Perfumes 40% off

Monday - 27 November 2017
The biggest sale of the year, and the chance to stock up on 100% natural perfumes for yourself, your friends and family.
Use the code cyber40 at checkout for the 40% off discount!
Sale items on this page only. 
 
Strange Magic – exotic and unique, made from organic flower tinctures. Other EdPs to choose from.



4ml parfum – easy to carry in your bag or pocket. Select from 12 award-winning perfumes.
Anya's Garden Perfumes Sample Box
1/3ml samples of Anya’s Perfumes

Natural Perfume Discounts on Tuition, oils, and perfumemaking kits

Saturday - 18 November 2017

 

How Autumn got Trashed by Hurricane Irma

This was going to be most heartfelt newsletter I’ve ever sent because I want to share the events of September and October and explain why I’ve been so quiet. Yes, I kept posting on Facebook, but behind the scenes, there is a lot of recovery and catch-up going on in the day-to-day businesses I run. I decided to blog later about the events instead, and just concentrate here on the love and passion for perfumes, and their creation. And I also decided to offer discounts, and pledge 10% of the sales to hurricane relief efforts. Use the links to discounted sale items at the end of this post.
 
I’ll let you know when I have it together enough to write about September and October, it’s just too fresh right now. So a remedy? Share the project that stirs as much passion in me as creating perfumes – teaching others how to make beautiful, professional perfumes!
My perfume organ with diluted essences, a working model I introduced to natural perfumery in my Basic natural perfume course.

10th Anniversary of the Natural Perfumery Institute Blew Right By!

Something very important to me that fell by the wayside due to Irma was the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Natural Perfumery Institute, an educational place for learning the ancient and modern aspects of natural perfume. It was the first online course in natural perfumery, and I share many years experience with the students in the form of a textbook, a real textbook, the first of its kind for perfumery. I had no time to announce, or celebrate, this milestone, the 10th anniversary. Thinking about the need for such a course, and then developing it, was a goal I accomplished.
 
If you are considering studying perfumery, I am offering an early holiday discount on tuition, the perfume making kits, and select aromatics from my botanicals line. Do you, or someone you love, desire to learn perfumery? This course is dynamic and covers the breadth and depth of the art of perfumery.
 
To learn more about the discounts visit:
 
This page for the $100 to $300 discount on the course tuition and kits.
 
and:
 
This page for discounts on Boronia, Sandalwood, and Vanilla.
 
These are the only pages coded with the discounts. There will be wonderful discounts on my perfumes next week for Black Friday, so be sure to open your newsletter to see what I’m offering. The tuition and aromatics discount will be available until Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017.
 
From Miami, our best wishes
Anya, Brian, Gracie, Andrea, and Dailyn
 

natural perfumery institute textbook cover

Natural Perfumery Institute cover. Textbook written by Anya McCoy.